Knowing When Not to Fight

Not Fighting and Giving Up

A battle from Age of Empires 3.
A battle from Age of Empires III.

If I was to tell you that I wasn’t fighting anymore, invariably you’d think I’d given up, wouldn’t you?  In any of the copious video games that I play – Civilisation 5, Age of Empires III, that sort of thing – if you stop fighting then you’ve effectively surrendered.  To win, you have to defeat the other players; to defeat the other players, you have to fight.  If you know the games in question, you could argue that in Age of Empires II, you can win by building a Wonder of the World or capturing all the religious relics and holding them for a set amount of time, but in order to stop the enemy from taking them, guess what…you have to fight!

If you’re like me and you play similar games, you might think it’s a bit odd for someone to say “don’t fight”.  Almost controversially, that’s exactly what I’m saying to you now.

Don’t fight.

It’s a fine line between not fighting and giving up, but it’s an important differentiation that I think needs to be established.  After all…it’s your life we’re talking about here!

The Fight of Our Lives

Depression, anxiety, bipolar and other mental health struggles have one thing in common: they’re a battle.  Whether it’s pulling yourself out of a dark pit or fighting off a panic attack, or simply getting out of bed in the morning, it’s a fight.  The worst part is that fight lasts from the minute we get up to the minute we go to bed, and sometimes even though the night.  Every minute of every day, we find ourselves fighting battles in our heads.  Regardless of what those battles are, we find ourselves embroiled in them, fighting for control.

It sounds like some kind of epic fantasy story, along the lines of the Wheel of Time or the Lord of the Rings, doesn’t it?  (Please tell me you enjoy those!)

With all those waking moments taken up in the fight of our lives, not much thought is given to the concept of not fighting.  Whether it’s stigma or whether it’s something more, this idea of not fighting is very much akin to the notion of giving up.  Giving up in a mental health battle, as I’m sure you thought when you read those words, means suicide.

Not something we want to consider.

But this notion is wrong.

Picking the Battles to Fight

When I tell you not to fight, I don’t mean give up.  Absolutely not!  Keep fighting with every breath and ounce of energy that you have.  No one deserves to lose that fight.  Instead, I’m telling you to pick your battles.  Choose when to fight.

My example?  It’s comes directly from my journey.  See, I’m convinced that my medication isn’t working as well as it should.  A lot of people would tell me that my expectations of it are far too high, that I’m thinking it will do more than it actually will.  Others will give me that classic line “you’re making a big deal of nothing”.  Charming, really!  My point, though, is that those notions can make me want to fight what my body is telling me.  My body says that the meds aren’t working sufficiently, yet my instinct would be to fight it.  Refuse to go to the doctors, that sort of thing.

But where will that get me?

Similarly, there are people who would fight the idea of going on medication in the first place.  Others will fight the necessity to take a trip to the doctor – a bit like I did originally – trying to convince themselves that nothing’s wrong.  They’ll continue fighting themselves – out of stubbornness or fear or whatever else might be motivating them – and effectively making the problem worse.

It’s all about picking the battles.

Choose Your Battlefield

You are the experts on yourselves, guys.  You know what you can do, what you can’t do and so on.  With that in mind, pick your battles carefully.  Don’t delude yourselves into believing things are fine if they’re not.  Try not to get caught up in spats between other mental health sufferers, because those realistically won’t help anyone.  If there is a treatment plan devised for you, don’t fight it.  Believe me, with only so many spoons to hand, it isn’t worth fighting it.  It will save you energy in the long run.

So pick your battles.

You’re not giving up.

You’re not losing.

Instead, you’re being smart.  Tactical.  Clever.

You’ve got this.  More than you might care to believe.

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Become a PatronDisclaimer: I am not an expert, nor am I medically qualified.  This blog is based on my personal experiences only.  Always seek medical advice in the first instance.

How Can I Be More Resilient?

How Can I Be More Resilient than I Already Am?

We all know that life can throw challenges at you that can knock you off-balance. Even the most mentally tough person can be knocked sideways by events; losing a loved one, being made redundant, stress of moving home. There are a vast plethora of events that can turn your world upside down. Recently it was raised with me that I’m not coping as well as I should be, that despite all the medication and counselling, I’ve not progressed as well as expected. Looking at what’s been going on over the last six months, I can see why. I’ve returned to work, I’ve moved house, I’m battling with an ex over custody arrangements of our children. I’m still learning how to cope with dragging myself to work on days when depression wants to sink its claws in and drag me back to bed. And even though I’m doing it, I’m managing to deal with everything that has been going on, it’s still not enough. Asking for more support in certain areas has led to some questioning whether I’m well enough. It’s also led to me thinking how can I be more resilient? On the days when my ex is being a tool, or when a stranger in the street has reminded me so much of my late dad that I’m tumbling into darkness; how? How can I be more resilient to that other than through what I’m doing already and time?
Who Sets the Standard?
We are all guilty of a ‘keeping up with the Joneses’ mentality. We look at others and measure ourselves against them. Be it their success in work, the big house, the perfect children or the great figure and looks, we all do it. We set the bar so high from what we see others seeming to manage effortlessly, that we set ourselves up to fail.
But there’s a dirty little secret to all this. You have absolutely no idea what is going on in that person’s life. The shiny perfect exterior that you envy so much? It’s just that. An exterior. You have no idea what is going on beneath the surface. For those who suffer with mental health issues, a mask is incredibly important. It hides the struggle and darkness within. The death of Sophie Gradon this week, along with so many others that seemingly have the perfect life on paper, shows that a pretty smile can hide a lot.
When I spoke to a friend about the comments that had been made to me, she cocked an eyebrow at me and asked. ‘So they’re mental health experts now, are they?’ She’s right. The person who made those comments is not a mental health expert. My doctor is. And my doctor says I’m improving. Compared to where I was 6 months ago, compared to where I was a year ago I’ve come one hell of a long way. Yes, I feel I need to find ways how I can be more resilient, but when you look at everything I’ve been through, I’m more resilient than some think.
So how can I be MORE resilient?
That’s the tricky part. No-one is infallible and everyone is different. Yes, there are things we can do to improve our resilience. Taking time out, practising self-care and being more assertive can help improve resilience. They really can. But equally no-one has the right to tell you how resilient you should be. It’s that whole ‘just get over it‘ mentality wrapped up in different words. We are all different. Our resilience flexes with the stresses and strains of life, like a branch of a tree in the wind. We can help shore it up and strengthen it so that it can battle the smaller storms, but sometimes there may be a storm that causes a break. But, just like a tree we can heal, we can grow. New shoots can appear from the break and head in unexpected directions.
So in answer to the question, how can I be more resilient? The answer is this. You will be. It just takes time and no-one can know how long or in what form it will take. But when it’s there, you’ll know.

Episode 38 – Dying Light: A Life With Depression

Dying Light…a survival game full of zombies, thugs and terrors of the darkness.  You are a GRE operative tasked with retrieving a stolen file and you get caught up in the middle of the quarantined and infected city of Harran.  But…what does this have to do with mental health?  Take a walk with me as I bring a refreshing and surprising twist on this amazing video game!

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In the Pursuit of a Cure

A Cure for an Ailment

It’s a common thing in today’s society: if we are sick then we go to the doctor and the doctor provides us with a cure.  If anything, the medical world revolves around cures nowadays.  We have cures and medicines for many ailments, don’t we?  In 1897, the first vaccine for the Bubonic plague was developed.  1899, Felix Hoffman developed aspirin.  1992, the first vaccine developed for hepatitis A.  Medicine is constantly evolving.

Cure in a bottle.Despite the many advancements with modern medicines and treatments, there is still a lot of controversy surrounding the topic.  Many people stand for medicine, many stand against it.  There are those who believe that you should accept your own fate or “God’s Will” over your life instead of prolonging it artificially.  Others would say the economic costs of prolonging our lives are too much when the elderly can’t work and pay taxes.  Others still argue on the side of animal rights.

In the world of mental health, people are similarly divided on the topic of medication.  Should you use it?  Should you avoid it?  Some argue that you should use more natural, holistic approaches, such as yoga or therapy.  Others argue that medication is the only effective treatment.  Then you have people like me who come down on the approach that you should find whatever works for you, be it therapy, medication, a combination or something else.

As I say: it’s divisive.

The Focus on the Cure

As beneficial as many of these treatments have been, however, there are still many things that cannot be cured.  Cancer, for example, is one such illness.  Many advancements have been made in that particular field of research but, as of yet, we cannot cure it.  Similarly, there is no cure for an array of mental illnesses.  Depression, anxiety, bipolar…none of these have any kind of magic bullet that can cure us from them.

Which causes a problem.

You see, people are focused on the cure.  Wouldn’t you say?  People are focused on that cure.  There are a lot of people that I come across on social media who give you the “5 step guide to curing your depression” and other such philosophies and remedies.  Even though they don’t cure people, they throw the word in because it grabs attention.  People look for that cure, they look for the answer to their problems.  After all, it’s all about the solution, is it not?

Regardless, those who are struggling with any condition tend to look towards the cure.  What can they get that will alleviate the symptoms that they’re battling?  Is it a pill?  A treatment?  Something else?  Whatever form it takes, that cure is at the top of their priorities.

Yet should it be?

In the Pursuit of a Cure

We pursue those cures like they’re the lost treasure of El Dorado or the hidden knowledge of Atlantis.  It’s become the most important thing that we can think of: curing that illness that we suffer from.  Sometimes we will try anything – conventional and non-conventional methods – to find that magic bullet.  But…what if there isn’t one?

Finding a cure.

That’s right…what if there isn’t one?

Not everything is curable, is it?  I mentioned cancer earlier which, as of yet, remains incurable.  So what if all this time, all this effort that we’re putting in, is actually for nothing?  What if…what if we cannot be cured?

Now I’m not for one minute saying don’t look for the cure.  We should all be looking for that cure.  No, what I’m saying is that we shouldn’t make that our primary focus.  We should be learning how to live with our conditions, learning to manage them without becoming desperate for that cure.  After all, it might not happen.  Our journeys have so much to teach us.  So many things we wouldn’t learn otherwise.  Does that not make the journey more important than the cure?

Find the Cure

Find the cure.  Don’t give up hope.  If you can find it, great.  If not?  Then perhaps use your condition for a different purpose.  Perhaps to help someone else.  Or to do something you wouldn’t normally do.  After all, it’s what you make of it.  But see what you can do.  You might surprise yourself.

Who knows?  In some ways, taking your illness and turning it from a curse to a blessing might be the very cure that you seek…

What do you think?

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The Dreaded Question

Question After Question

Questions.  Our lives seem to revolve around them and be driven by them, don’t they?  Job interviews, health checkups, shopping visits, even some of the ordinary conversations we have; there are questions.  “Where can I find…?”  “How do I do this?”  “Would you like fries with that?”  OK, that last question might not be such a frequent occurrence but it still crops up every now and again!

Regardless, we come across many questions in our lives.  Some of them are easy.  Others…not so much.  That being said, it’s a normal part of life, to question.  One of the things my partner’s toddler often does is practically interrogates us.  I’m sure parents are familiar with the word “why?”  Combine it with “but why?” or “OK…why?” and you’re got a recipe for a headache!!  Children are inquisitive by nature though, aren’t they?  It’s how they learn, how they grow.

As we get older, though, those questions become less inquisitive and more practical.  We ask how to do things, what kinds of specifications there are and other such things.  Sometimes it can lead to secrets or to the latest gossip, but we can be just as curious as those children.

An Uncomfortable Question

Not all questions are good questions though, as I’m sure you’d expect.  If I was to ask you all what your least favourite, or most uncomfortable question, I’m sure you would all the say the same thing…

“How are you?”

Yikes!

What do we even say in response?  For the majority of us, we’ll put on a smile and say “I’m fine”.  Even if we’re not fine, we’ll say that we are anyway because if we don’t, we unleashed a tidal wave barrage of more questions.  No one wants that, aside from masochists!  Why would we want to be asked more questions on top of the uncomfortable “how are you”???

But that’s just an uncomfortable question.  I believe there is one that’s even worse…

Intrigued?

Want to know what it is?

The Dreaded Question

So here it is, the dreaded question.  Personally, I believe it to be a horrible one, though admittedly it’s one that I use loads, especially when talking to others who are struggling.  Have you guessed it?  The question is:

“What can I do to help?”

That’s right: I asked “What can I do to help?”  On the surface, it might not seem like that bad a question but really it’s probably one of the most frustrating and exasperating questions ever asked!  Or is that just me and I’m overexaggerating it…?  I’m never sure!

See, people ask us this question when we’re struggling and it seems like a perfectly innocent question.  Yet…what do we say?  Just like “how are you”, we have no idea what to say.  Most of the time, we don’t have an answer we can give to ourselves, never mind anyone else!  How do we answer that question when we don’t even know what would help us?

Now, it’s not that people are being mean when they ask this question, as really they’re asking because they care.  Yet sometimes it’s one of the most awkward things that we can be faced with.

So how do we deal with it?  What can we do?

An Alternative

As difficult as it is, an alternative is possible.  One of my favourite suggestions is, instead of asking what people can do, simply come alongside them and try this:

“I know you’re not particularly good at the moment, so I just wanted to remind you that I’m here for you.”

It’s simple, it’s reasonably succinct and it gets the right message across.  There’s no pressure, then, to figure out what’s wrong, no obligation to give a truthful answer if we don’t really want to answer the question in the first place.

Believe me, it takes a major retraining of the brain because it’s almost human nature to ask what we can do to help, but it will be worth it.

So why not try it?

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Become a PatronDisclaimer: I am not an expert, nor am I medically qualified.  This blog is based on my personal experiences only.  Always seek medical advice in the first instance.

 

A Frank Discussion feat. Hope Virgo – Eating Disorder Awareness Week

We are very pleased to welcome Hope Virgo, author of Stand Tall Little Girl, to our podcast to have a discussion about eating disorders.  For our Eating Disorder Awareness week, we are looking at the issues surrounding anorexia and bulimia, what people who suffer with them go through and much more!  In this episode, Hope talks about her own struggle with anorexia and has an important message for others who struggle.

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Fighting Back

When Clouds Descend

I’ll be honest, I haven’t written anything in weeks.  Life has been hectic with moving house, my daughter’s birthday and working. In all the hullabaloo I failed to realise my prepayment certificate for my prescriptions had run out. Which meant I rapidly ran out of my anti-depressants. I tried to stretch them out, taking lower doses while I waited and waited for my new certificate to arrive. With the move, affording additional prescription charges was unthinkable and as I didn’t see it as a priority I just let it slide. Yeah, I know. Stupid. A small part of me felt that I was coping. I’ve been fighting back against depression for so long and managed it before without the aid of medication, I truly believed I would be fine.

I was wrong.

For a While…

For a while, I seemed ok. Realistically for a while my high dose of Sertraline was still happily coursing through me, doing it’s job. As the doses became lower, I did not even notice the subtle changes that started to creep in. I started to become tired more often, something I attributed to the stress of moving and work.  Yet no matter how tired I felt, I couldn’t sleep properly. Waking often and for longer periods started to become nightly. When I did sleep, my dreams were becoming increasingly distressing and vivid. To the point that I was not just talking in my sleep, but physically responding to unseen attackers, kicking and thrashing with enough force that on one night Alex had to restrain my wrists in his hands.

I still wouldn’t admit that something was wrong. For someone who regularly encourages others to talk openly about their mental health, I was setting  a very poor example.  I wanted to put on that mask of every thing being fine. I have so much to be happy about. We’re in our new home and it’s everything I have ever wanted. My little girl finally has a room of her own that she has always deserved. My life is moving forwards with the man I love. Life is good. I was ashamed to admit that even with all this good in my life, I was still slipping back into the void.

Fighting Insidiousness

But like I said, despite my active mental health advocacy and all the support I have, those darker thoughts were starting to creep in. This is why I wanted to talk about this. Depression is insidious. When it’s claws are deep rooted within your psyche, it’s like a weed. You think you have beaten it back,driven it out to the root, but it only takes a little seed and it will take that opportunity to grow once more.

I know because it grew again. The little hints that the monster in my head was rising again were just so subtle, even I was deluded that it was being kept at bay. I didn’t see it. All I could see was my worthlessness , my failures. My complete and utter inadequacy, to the point I began to convince myself that everyone who I care about would be better off without me.

“It’s OK, it’ll Be OK”

There is no moment more horrifying than when you find yourself in the car pulling yourself out of suicidal thoughts and realising what pulled you out is your 4 year old saying ‘it’s OK Mummy, it’ll be OK. ‘ I was sickened, yet the thoughts were still swirling. That awful voice in my head was trying to convince me to leave my daughter with a relative under some pretext and just take myself away.  Funny though, just that thought arising made me start fighting back.

I tried to call my mum, just to get someone on the phone to stop those thoughts in their tracks. She wasn’t in. The thoughts started to scream at me how alone I was…No one cared. I still don’t know how I managed to leave a voice note for Alex, but I did. What he heard scared him sufficiently to call back immediately . I couldn’t talk. But my little one held the phone and talked to him, she told him we were coming home. That little voice, the one I know I could never hurt assuredly told the man I loved that she and I were going home. So we did.

A complete an utter mess.

Afraid Of The Monster in Me

It’s been a long time since I was last that afraid of myself. That complete feeling of not trusting myself. What it proved to me is I’m not quite ready to come off my meds yet, that I need to do more work on myself first before that day can come. Now I know that there are some who argue that meds are the new villain  in mental health care, too easily dished out in a quick fix solution because the waiting lists and demand on counselling is huge.

This is true. The NHS is struggling with the demand and far too many people are slipping through the cracks. It shouldn’t be the case that meds are being handed out like candy because the system is so over burdened that monitoring of those with mental health conditions is near non existent.

It shouldn’t be this way. But the reality is that it is. I get very little to no monitoring from my GP, counselling is one session  a month at best. The intervening gaps between appointments and reviews is huge and entirely reliant on me pushing for them. There is just no money available for on going care for those with mental health issues. And it’s a story we hear again and again.

Too many people who are told by their doctor that if their symptoms worsen to come back in and book an appointment, too many times health care professionals cite that victims of suicide had ‘protective factors‘ but no review was undertaken. If you have cancer, you have follow up appointments, check ups, scans. If you have a heart condition, a specialist monitors you with ECG’s, blood pressure checks and you will even be referred to a dietitian to help improve your health through change of eating if required.

But as I have found time and time again with depression and other mental illnesses, despite how fatal these illnesses can be if left unchecked, there is little to no follow up or after care. If you have to cancel an appointment too many times  with your counsellor (twice as a rule, and that’s not a case of not just turning up, I mean cancelling even with valid reasons) you will be bounced back to your GP.

Coulda, Shoulda, Woulda

Would my recent spiral have been spotted with more regular contact with a counsellor of doctor? The honest answer is I don’t know, but I really feel that it would have been at least identified that I was struggling with a lot of different factors and there was an issue with having my medication available. I was lucky. My protective factor of my daughter was there, but that’s a ridiculous burden to place on a child. I’m now putting myself back together again, but it’s incredibly hard and puts a lot of pressure on those around me. No one should have to hear the one they love sobbing into the phone to Samaritans that they are fighting just to stay alive,  that they afraid to be alone for fear of what they will do.

Yes, I as the patient have a responsibility to report changes, but how can I when just getting an appointment with my GP is near impossible . And like I said, depression is insidious. It crept out on me again  from those dark corners and I didn’t even see it coming even with all my expereince  and knowledge.

Fighting Back

The way mental health is monitored and cared for needs to change.  In the mean time we need to keep on looking at those we care about. If we see little changes, say something. If you suspect an issue is going to be a trigger for you as a sufferer, say something to someone. We need to try and keep talking because when we clam up, the voice in your head can be a devious and cruel monster. We can’t let it win. So let’s keep fighting back.

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Finding Hope in the Darkness

We all know that holding onto hope can be difficult, don’t we? So this week I have a challenge for you all! Why not take a look?

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Evaluating Experience

The Weight of Experience

Experience is one of those things that we seem plagued with in life.  Often, it can be beneficial because there are situations we go through and we know what to do or not do because experience has taught us.  Sometimes, though, experience can be a problem.  Take, for example, a job interview.  Nowadays, a lot of companies want previous experience – something which you, as a fresh-out-of-uni/college student, might not have.  Getting that experience can be difficult, especially if no one will give you a chance without you having previous experience.  It can be extremely frustrating!Quote: Experience is the teacher of all things - Julius Caeser.

Another thing that usually goes hand in hand with experience is qualifications.  If you are going for a job as a translator, for example, employers will look to see if you have the experience (ie, living in the country of the language you are translating to/from) and whether or not you have the qualifications (ie a degree or equivalent).  Qualifications are something that can be hard to come by, though at the same time a lot of people nowadays go to university to get degrees and an emphasis is put on getting higher education.  Sometimes, though, things happen, plans change and qualifications become a little redundant.

Take me, for example.  I trained as a linguist, getting a degree in French and Linguistics.  I didn’t do too badly and languages open a lot of doors, as it provides opportunities in translation but also in different countries if I wanted to move.  Having a background in Czech as well from the time I lived in the Czech Republic with my family, you’d think I would have gone into a career in languages.

Then depression happened.

Granted, getting a job in those fields was rather difficult and I ended up first in a wholesaler warehouse and then a bank, but depression knocked my career aspirations completely off.  Instead of looking at translation or language teaching or a career in France, I looked into blogging.  Specifically, mental health blogging and writing.

Which, as you know, is what I do now.

Experience…Or Lack Thereof

From that bit of my background, you’ll have seen I don’t have any qualifications in mental health.  In fact, you’ll see on every page of this website the words: I am not an expert, nor am I medically qualified.  Always seek medical advice in the first instance.  I put that because, no matter what I write, I am not qualified.

But I have experience.

Now, one thing I’ve noticed during my walk with depression, anxiety and insomnia is that people seem to look more for the qualifications.  When I first started posting content from this website on Facebook, a psycologist that I know immediately started commenting telling me she was surprised I was doing this and how “in her experience” these were the arguments against what I was saying.  She also went to great lengths, at one point, to make sure I knew exactly how long she had studied and how long she had been a psycologist.  Similarly, in my post about the So-Called Professional, I went with my friend to speak to that doctor after that disasterous appointment and she was equally dismissive of the things I had to say.

In more recent weeks, I’ve had similar struggles with my own GP.  I believe the things I’m feeling and experiencing, such as the vast swinging of my mood, to be symptomatic of Rapid Cycling Bipolar or Ultra Rapid Cycling Bipolar.  It’s taken a couple of months but I’ve finally managed to get a GP to listen.  It took both my partner and I fighting, where the GP refused to entertain the notion based on “his experience”.  It seems my lack of any qualifications and my lesser experience than his was simply not good enough for me to have an opinion, as it seems to be with a lot of other people.

But is experience all that it’s cracked up to be?  Is it the be all and end all?

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Extenuating Experience

One thing that I find to be true is that those of us who have personal experience of mental health seem to relate to it far better.  I know this is like the majority of things in life but hear me out.  Where doctors see us as patients who have X condition and need treatment A, therapy B and department C to be successfully treated, we take it to a more personal level.  We interact with each other, we look at how things affect us and apply that to other situations.

Customer Experience MattersMy prime example would be my blog.  Specifically, things like my Understanding Self-Harm guide.  Imagine a doctor whose only experience of self-harm is the patients in front of him and what they’ve done.  Explaining self-harm the way I have would be difficult, if not impossible.  Would he understand all the innate needs and desires that we feel when we want to do it?  Could he imagine just how different all those needs or desires would be?  After all, no two mental health struggles are exactly the same.

Is not my experience, in this instance, far more valuable than his years of training, his qualifications and then his subsequent years of qualification?  Am I not able to explain the phenomenon of self-harm better than the doctor might?  Now don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying that my opinion is so much better than the professional, qualified opinion.  What I’m saying is that my opinion is different and that that can be a good thing!  You see, the professionals, with all their years of study, qualification and experience, will have all the technicalities, the medical and physiological answers down to a T.  Me, standing in for the lay person Joe Public, will have the whys, the hows and some of the reasoning behind what I do.

Is that so difficult to imagine?

That I, Alex Davies, lay person with no qualifications in the mental health sector whatsoever, might actually have a different, yet just as important, understanding of mental health?

The Power of Our Experiences

Unlike the professionals, as not all of them will have lived with these conditions, we know what’s going on inside our heads.  We know where we fall on categorisations.  Mood charts and on everything else that would come under our diagnosis, we understand.  We know how we feel.  Don’t we?  We know if something isn’t right.  Does that mean we should always bow to the professional opinion because they have their qualifications?

No.

I don’t think so.

Professionals are great, as they have the technical side of things nailed, this is true.  But we understand what’s actually going on inside our heads.  My opinion may not be a learned, qualified one but, instead, it’s one brought through first-hand experience and one that, in its own way, is just as valuable.

What do you think?  Are our experiences and our opinions just as valid as the professional one?  I’d like to know!

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Become a PatronDisclaimer: I am not an expert, nor am I medically qualified.  This blog is based on my personal experiences only.  Always seek medical advice in the first instance.

Episode 37 – The Importance of Informed Choice

When we see a doctor about mental illness, whether it’s getting diagnosed or a follow-up appointment, we often feel as though we’ve been left uninformed or sometimes even misinformed.  With little time in which to see people, doctors are forced to rush patients through but at what cost?  At the cost of the information we need?  In this episode, I look at the importance of informed choice when choosing between therapy and medication.

Useful Links:

Episode 34 – Medication Mentalities
#MedsWorkedForMe
Drugs Don’t Work

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Why not subscribe?

Subscribe today to receive a free chapter from my eBook “Pills and Blades”, a subscriber-exclusive podcast episode and more!

Become a PatronDisclaimer: I am not an expert, nor am I medically qualified.  This blog is based on my personal experiences only.  Always seek medical advice in the first instance.